Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Skip to content Skip to navigation
earth matters
science and insights for people who care about Earth, its resources and its environment
molten iron in steel factory
May 25, 2017
Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Shocking complex metal mixtures with high pressure could lead to desirable properties such as higher heat resistance and allow power plants and engines to run hotter and more efficiently.

rainforest
May 16, 2017

Stanford scientists explain the risks of betting the world’s future on massive-scale deployment of carbon removal technologies.

Workers in Ecuador spray insecticide to kill mosquitoes
May 10, 2017

A new analysis by Stanford researchers reveals that the ideal temperature for the spread of mosquito-born diseases like dengue, chikungunya and Zika is 29 degrees C. This finding helps predict disease outbreaks in a warming world.

floodplains in the upper Colorado River Basin
May 1, 2017

A new study reveals that organic matter whose breakdown would yield only minimal energy for hungry microorganisms preferentially builds up in floodplains, illuminating a new mechanism of carbon sequestration.

April 28, 2017

Studying how and why bridges have collapsed in the past identifies the limitation of current risk assessment approach and demonstrates the value of new perspectives on climate change impact.

Clouds and waves
April 24, 2017

A new four-step “framework” aims to test the contribution of climate change to record-setting extreme weather events.

April 19, 2017

Stanford research shows plugging methane leaks will cost about a third less than the EPA estimates, further underscoring the cost-effectiveness of emissions mitigation – but the agency will also likely fall short of its 2025 reduction targets.

asteroid impact
April 13, 2017

The dino-killing asteroid that crashed into the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico could have generated massive seismic waves that triggered earthquakes as far away as Colorado, in a region where no previous fault existed, according to research by Stanford Earth's Norm Sleep. 

almond trees
April 12, 2017

Over-pumping groundwater has drastically and permanently reduced the water storage capabilities of land in one of California’s most important farming areas.

Dean Pamela Matson
April 7, 2017

Sustainability efforts today are critical to meet the needs of people now and over the long term, and Stanford has a leadership role.